Posts Tagged ‘Chinese five-spice’

Singapore Turkey Stew

February 12th, 2011 by andrea | No Comments | Filed in Asian, Main Dish, Recipes, Soup/Stew

I had a friend over for lunch the other day and served her this hearty stew filled with Asian-flavored turkey meatballs and crunchy vegetables in a light coconut broth. It was colorful, flavorful and satisfying. I only wish I had doubled the recipe! 

When I was at the store buying ingredients for the soup, the Roma tomatoes were pretty sad looking so I went with 3/4 cup of canned diced tomatoes (drained) instead. For a fun presentation, eat the soup with Asian soup spoons (available at many kitchen stores and Asian markets). Enjoy!

Singapore Turkey Stew
-adapted from The Sunset Cookbook (Oxmoor House, 2010)

Notes: If you can’t find Chinese five spice, substitute equal parts ground cinnamon, ground cloves, ground ginger, and ground anise seeds.

Makes 4 servings

1 pound ground lean turkey
1/2 teaspoon Chinese five spice (see notes)
1/2 teaspoon hot chili flakes
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
1 can (13 1/2 oz.) coconut milk
1 can (14 1/2 oz.) fat-skimmed chicken broth
1 head bok choy (12 oz.), rinsed, stem end trimmed, and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 can (14 oz.) baby corn, drained
2 Roma tomatoes (about 8 oz. total), rinsed, cored, and chopped
(I used 3/4 cup diced canned tomatoes, drained)
1/4 cup drained canned sliced water chestnuts
1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 tablespoon soy sauce
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

In a large bowl, mix ground turkey, five spice, chili flakes, and salt. Shape mixture into 1-inch balls. Pour flour onto a large rimmed plate and roll balls in flour to coat lightly.

Pour oil into a 4- to 5-quart nonstick pan over medium-high heat. Add meatballs in a single layer. Cook, turning frequently, until lightly browned all over and barely pink in the center (cut to test), 5 to 7 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a plate.

Add garlic and ginger to pan and stir just until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add coconut milk, broth, and meatballs; bring to a simmer. Adjust heat to maintain a simmer, cover, and cook until meatballs are no longer pink in the center, about 5 minutes.

Stir in bok choy, baby corn, tomatoes, water chestnuts, green onions, lime juice, soy sauce and cook, stirring often, until bok choy leaves are wilted and stems are barely tender to bite, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with cilantro and serve from pan.

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Crockpot Sweet and Spicy Asian Pork Shoulder

October 11th, 2010 by andrea | 7 Comments | Filed in Asian, Crockpot, Main Dish, Pork, Recipes

This recipe rocks! Just throw a few ingredients in the crockpot, let it cook for 4-8 hours (depending on low or high setting) and you’ve got a flavorful meal with very little effort. The super-tender pork is flavored with five-spice, soy sauce and ginger, and gets a little heat from the chili-garlic sauce. The addition of bok choy at the end of cooking adds a bit of crunchy texture and a slightly bitter flavor that rounds out the sweet and spicy flavor of the pork. Serve with steamed jasmine rice (which can be made ahead, if needed, then refrigerated and reheated) and you’re in business!

Since the recipe calls for pork shoulder, I bought boneless country-style ribs (which are cut from the pork shoulder) and cut them into 2″ pieces. The country-style ribs were a cinch to prep.  I bought a big pack of them at Costco and used half for this recipe (I froze the rest). 

Note: I read a review of this recipe at the Real Simple website and some cooks stated that they thought the dish was too salty. I didn’t have that problem but if you’re concerned with salt, you could always add a 1/3 cup or so of water to the soy sauce mixture before adding in the pork.

Slow Cooker Sweet and Spicy Asian Pork Shoulder
-recipe from Real Simple Magazine

Sold in the spice aisle of many supermarkets, Chinese five-spice powder is typically made from a combination of cinnamon, cloves, fennel seed, star anise, and Szechuan peppercorns. Delicious in braised dishes, it also wakes up stir-fries and grilled meats. Serves 4.

1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 to 2 tablespoons chili-garlic sauce (found in the Asian aisle of the supermarket)
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder (optional)
kosher salt and black pepper
2 1/2 pounds pork shoulder, trimmed of excess fat and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 cup long-grain white rice
1 medium head bok choy, thinly sliced (about 8 cups)
2 scallions, sliced
Directions

In a 4- to 6-quart slow cooker, combine the soy sauce, sugar, chili-garlic sauce, ginger, five-spice powder (if using), ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Add the pork and toss to coat. Cook, covered, until the pork is tender, on high for 4 to 5 hours or on low for 7 to 8 hours.

Twenty-five minutes before serving, cook the rice according to the package directions.

Meanwhile, skim off and discard any fat from the pork. Gently fold the bok choy into the pork and cook, covered, until heated through, 2 to 4 minutes. Serve with the rice and sprinkle with the scallions.

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Five-Spice Chicken Noodle Salad

August 17th, 2010 by andrea | 5 Comments | Filed in Asian, Grilling/BBQ, Pasta, Quick Cooking, Recipes, Salad

 

This is a great summer recipe because it’s light, cool and refreshing. Be liberal with your use of the fresh mint and cilantro…it brings a ton of flavor to the salad!

I’ve made this salad with different types of rice noodles, and rice sticks work as well as rice vermicelli. Whatever type of rice noodles you use, cook them according to the directions on the package (soaking the noodles in hot water like the recipe states didn’t cook them enough). After the noodles are cooked and drained, I like to toss them with some of the dressing. Then I layer the chicken, shredded carrots, fresh herbs and chopped peanuts on top of the noodles and drizzle with more dressing. Sometimes I add a dash or two of soy sauce for a little extra flavor. Enjoy!

Five-Spice Chicken Noodle Salad
-recipe from Sunset Magazine (June 2010)

Like a cross between a noodle bowl and a salad, this dish is low in fat and has a kick. Yield:  Serves 4

2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 teaspoons Chinese five-spice powder
1 teaspoon sugar
4 boned, skinned chicken breast halves
1 package (6 oz.) rice vermicelli
1 cup coarsely shredded carrots
1/2 cup cilantro
1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
1/4 cup crushed peanuts
Chile Lime Dressing (recipe below)

1. Heat grill to medium (350° to 450°).

2. Mix soy sauce, oil, five-spice powder, and sugar in a shallow dish. Turn chicken in marinade and let stand 5 to 10 minutes.

3. Heat a large pot of water to boiling.

4. Drain chicken, discarding marinade. Oil cooking grate, using tongs and a wad of oiled paper towels. Grill chicken, covered, turning once, until cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes.

5. Add vermicelli to pot of water and turn off heat. Let stand until soft, 5 to 10 minutes; drain.

6. Divide noodles among dinner bowls. Thickly slice chicken, set on noodles, and top with carrots, herbs, and peanuts. Serve with dressing.

Chile Lime Dressing
-recipe from Sunset Magazine (June 2010)

This recipe goes with Five-Spice Chicken Noodle Salad. Yield:  Makes 1 cup.

1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
1/4 cup Vietnamese or Thai fish sauce
6 tablespoons lime juice
1 to 2 tablespoons minced red or green jalapeño chile

Mix 1/2 cup hot water and the sugar in a small bowl until sugar dissolves. Stir in remaining ingredients.

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Grilled Five-Spice Chicken Thighs

March 4th, 2010 by andrea | 4 Comments | Filed in Asian, Chicken, Grilling/BBQ, Main Dish, Recipes

These Asian-inspired chicken thighs grill up tender and flavorful, and take only minutes to prepare. Chinese five-spice powder is a blend of spices that has the five different flavors: sweet, sour, bitter, pungent, and salty. For this recipe, the five-spice (and a few other basic ingredients) are turned into a rub for the chicken. After grilling, the chicken thighs are tossed with a soy sauce and rice vinegar mixture and sprinkled with freshly chopped cilantro. To round out the meal, serve with steamed jasmine rice and some stir-fried veggies or an Asian slaw. Delicious!

For other recipe ideas, check out Foodie Friday.

Grilled Five-Spice Chicken Thighs with Soy-Vinegar Sauce & Cilantro
-recipe by Pamela Anderson for Fine Cooking Magazine
 
Serves four to six.

2 Tbs. Chinese five-spice powder
1 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. dark brown sugar
1 tsp. garlic powder
3/4 tsp. kosher salt
2 Tbs. soy sauce
2 tsp. rice vinegar
1 tsp. Asian sesame oil
1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
2-1/2 lb. boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 8 large, 10 medium, or 12 small), trimmed of excess fat
2 Tbs. vegetable oil; more for the grill
3 Tbs. chopped cilantro

Mix the five-spice powder, the 1 Tbs. sugar, the garlic powder, and the salt in a small bowl. In another bowl, mix the soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, red pepper flakes, and remaining 1 tsp. sugar.

Put the chicken in a shallow pan, drizzle with the vegetable oil, and toss to coat evenly. Sprinkle the spice mixture over the chicken; toss and rub to coat thoroughly.

Prepare a hot charcoal fire or heat a gas grill with all burners on medium high for 10 min. Clean the hot grate with a wire brush and then lubricate it with an oil-soaked paper towel. Put the chicken on the grate and grill (covered on a gas grill or uncovered over a charcoal fire) until one side has dark grill marks, 5 to 6 min. for large thighs or 4 to 5 min. for medium and small thighs. Turn and continue to grill until well marked on the other sides and cooked through, 5 to 6 min. longer for large thighs or 4 to 5 min. for medium and small thighs.

Move the thighs to a serving dish. Drizzle with about half of the soy mixture, sprinkle with the cilantro, and toss to coat. Let rest 4 to 5 min., tossing once or twice. Serve hot, warm, or at room temperature, with the remaining soy mixture passed at the table.

Variations:
To prepare as kebabs: Trim the thighs and then slice them lengthwise into 1-1/2- to 2-inch-wide strips. Toss with the flavorings; then thread the chicken onto six 8- or 12-inch skewers (soak wood skewers in water for at least 20 min. first), folding each strip in half as you skewer it. If some strips are very thick, cut them in half crosswise rather than folding them so that all the pieces of chicken are roughly the same size. Grill the kebabs, turning them every 4 to 5 min. as dark grill marks form, until cooked through, 12 to 15 min. total.

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Hawaiian-Style Braised Pork

April 1st, 2009 by andrea | No Comments | Filed in Asian, Main Dish, Pork

 haw-braised-pork

This Hawaiian-inspired pork dish is simple yet very tasty. The pork becomes extremely tender from braising over an hour in a broth mixture seasoned with Chinese five-spice powder, a blend of spices that incorporates the five basic flavors of Chinese cooking (sweet, sour, bitter, savory, and salty).  To save time on the Stir-fried Cabbage, substitute a bag of coleslaw mix for the whole cabbage and proceed with the recipe as written. Serve with steamed rice.  

Hawaiian-Style Braised Pork with Stir-Fried Cabbage
- recipe from Bon Appétit  Magazine, April 2002

“My wife, Jean, and I run a coffee farm on the Big Island of Hawaii,” writes George Fike of Keauhou Mauka, Hawaii. “I really love to cook, so we entertain a lot, and I enjoy planning the dinners as much as I do making them. I tell people the best restaurant in town is our house! Since I do most of the cooking, recipes must either be relatively fast or look after themselves. My recipe for Hawaiian-style pork has both of those qualities. It’s based on the traditional Hawaiian kalua pig, in which the meat is steamed in an underground oven. For this version, you don’t have to dig a pit in your back yard, and once everything’s in the pot — which involves chopping a few ingredients — it cooks slowly but doesn’t require a lot of attention.”

Complete this main course with steamed rice. Look for Chinese five-spice powder in the spice section of the supermarket.

Yield: Makes 6 to 8 servings

3 1/2 pounds boneless country-style pork spareribs, cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
6 garlic cloves, chopped
4 green onions, chopped
2 tablespoons chopped peeled fresh ginger
1 14-ounce can low-salt chicken broth
1/3 cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
1/4 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
Stir-fried Cabbage (recipe below)

Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper. Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add 1/3 of pork to pot and sauté until brown, about 6 minutes; transfer to bowl. Repeat with remaining pork. Add garlic, green onions, and ginger to pot; sauté 1 minute. Return pork and any juices to pot. Add 1 1/2 cups broth, soy sauce, sugar, crushed red pepper, and five-spice powder; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer until pork is very tender, about 1 hour 15 minutes. Stir remaining broth and cornstarch in cup to dissolve; mix into pork. Simmer until gravy thickens, stirring occasionally, about 3 minutes. Season with pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool slightly and chill. Rewarm over low heat.) Serve pork with cabbage.

Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper. Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add 1/3 of pork to pot and sauté until brown, about 6 minutes; transfer to bowl. Repeat with remaining pork. Add garlic, green onions, and ginger to pot; sauté 1 minute. Return pork and any juices to pot. Add 1 1/2 cups broth, soy sauce, sugar, crushed red pepper, and five-spice powder; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer until pork is very tender, about 1 hour 15 minutes. Stir remaining broth and cornstarch in cup to dissolve; mix into pork. Simmer until gravy thickens, stirring occasionally, about 3 minutes. Season with pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool slightly and chill. Rewarm over low heat.) Serve pork with cabbage.

Stir-Fried Cabbage

Yield: Makes 6 to 8 servings
 
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1 2-pound green cabbage, quartered, cored, very thinly sliced
6 green onions, chopped
1 tablespoon oriental sesame oil

Heat vegetable oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add ginger and stir 30 seconds. Add half of cabbage and toss until wilted, about 4 minutes. Add remaining cabbage, green onions, and sesame oil. Toss until all cabbage is crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper and serve.

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